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Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Tv Drama Writer Abdul Qadir Junejo

Born: November 1, 1945
Education: MA in sociology from Sindh University
Published work: Watoon, Ratyoon Ain Rol(1973); Shikliyoon (1979); Weender Wahi Lahandar Sijj (1984); Wada Adeeb Wadyoon Galhyoon (1984);Sono Roop Sijj (1986); Everest te Charhai (1987); Kursi (1998); Chho Chha Ain Keein (1999); Khat bin Adeeban Ja (1999); Dar Dar ja Musafir (2001); Wan Wan Jee Kathiee (2002).
Dramas: Six drama serials in Sindhi, 13 serials in Urdu including “Deewarein”, “Karwaan”, “Choti si Duniya”, “Seerhian”, “Dukh Sukh”, “Paranda”, “Dhool” and “Dararein”
Positions held: Director Institute of Sindhology Jamshoro (1988-93) Now serving as Additional Director at ISJ.
Awards: President’s Pride of Performance (1989). PTV Awards for best writer in 1983 and 1985
He is a man of folk wisdom and a winner of the President’s Pride of Performance award. He is also an outstanding drama writer, translator and an avid reader. He is Abdul Qadir Junejo, the popular Sindhi media icon.
Born in Tharparkar, Junejo is a versatile author. It is ironic how as a child he wanted to be a dacoit but ended up being the prolific scriptwriter of “Deewarein” — a drama serial on PTV that became an instant hit. “Being a Thari is what motivated me to produce the kind of work that I do. I acquired my diction and style of writing from Thar’s vibrant folklore,” he explains. Whether it’s drama, a short story or an article, Thar remains the focal point in his writings. Junejo’s visualization of Thar is so fascinating that it has made him popular among various sections of people. Junejo now is on his way to completing his first novel So Dess Musafir Munhinjo Re, which he says covers the history, geography, folk tales and traditions of Thar.
Besides, the region has also been a subject of his anthropological studies, apparent in the book Dar Dar ja Musafir, which provides a detailed account of the life and culture of the people living there. It also has information about nomadic tribes, such as the Jogis, Kabootras, Koochras, Rebaries and Balas, and contains articles about classical characters, ways of communication and the wildlife of the region. In one of his articles, he writes about the signs and symptoms which indicate rain, and discusses how snakes climb on trees and how camels, peacocks and other creatures react when it is about to rain.
He is something of an iconoclast when it comes to his craft and style. Junejo does not like receiving undue acclaim. When a notable Sindhi critic praised his stories, he quit writing them. “They thought, in my stories only the language is the grey matter. Such things made me give it up,” he protests. However, Junejo has three short story books to his credit — Watoon, Ratyoon Ain Rol, Weendar Wahi Lahandar Sijj, and Sono Roop Sijj — published in 1973, 1984 and 1986 respectively.
Although he is influenced by several writers, his writing style stands out to this day. Among them is the veteran scholar Mohammed Ibrahim Joyo, under whose shadow, Junejo bloomed as a writer and as translator. In fact, he has translated not only fiction, but also political commentaries as well as historical classics. Everest te Charhai, Chho Chha ain Keein and Wan Wan jee Kaathee are his collections of translations. From William Faulkner to Arundhati Roy, Junejo has introduced many renowned writers to Sindhi readers.
Drama is Junejo’s forte and over the years, he has written some memorable serials for PTV and promoted Sindhi as a language. Some of his drama serials include “Karwaan”, “Choti si Duniya”, “Seerhian”, “Dukh Sukh”, “Paranda”, “Dhool” and “Dararein”.
As far as his dramatic vision is concerned, Junejo has always tried to present an objective picture. His waderas and dacoits are bilateral. A wadera in Junejo’s realm is not a cruel monster, but a Sindhi man with many demerits, whereas people turned into dacoits because they had been victimized. Notorious characters are not just sinners, but have also been depicted as human beings.
It is very difficult to find a person in the Sindhi literary circles whose powers of observation are as strong as that of Junejo. He remains distinct because his work is not limited to his native land. Currently, he is writing dramas for some TV channels, while also penning articles in Sindhi. He is also planning to write an autobiography. Indeed, this larger than life writer is the salt of the earth of Sindh.

1 comment:

  1. Being sindhi and pakistani i am so proud of him.

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